Ontogenetic

Dear Professor,

While I am impressed by your vocabulary, I must say that when it comes to words sometimes simple words say it better. You are supposed to be teaching us your concepts, it would be far more effective if this did not involve me running to get a dictionary every few pages.

Example: "Here we can observe gradual ontogenetic seperation of the differentiation and syncretic forms, with temporary possibilities for their interpenetration."

I mean with time and the help of a dictionary I can decode this. But sweet fuck what are you trying to prove. Using big words to explain difficult concepts does not make you smart, being able to put concepts into language that anyone can understand is really a better sign of grasping a concept.

This class is one of the few things I will not miss when I graduate.

View Thinker #000000's profile

Scientific jargon does serve to help scientists communicate with each other easier. If two scientists completely understand their shared vocabulary, then they can pass around ideas quicker using specific, technical terms. Scientific jargon also serves to alienate students at the periphery of the scientific culture who get caught up in trying to decode unfamiliar words. There's a painful learning curve, sometimes, and I question whether or not a better teacher could make it less painful in some situations.

View Thinker #c00f9b's profile

I does serve a purpose in the scientific community. However, in an introductory course such jargon should not be used, or if it is used done so sparingly or explained in class. As opposed to throwing us with a book our TA who is currently getting her PHD fully admits that she does not understand.

I am an undergrad, if a PHD student in her last year doesn't get this, then I probably should not be expected to. And if nothing else the school should not have listed this course as a lower level one. Admittedly, if I was a psychologist, or a scientist I probably would still prefer plain speech. All the same though you can't blame a gal for getting frustrated.

View Thinker #277dd3's profile

I have no clue what those words mean, and my etymology is my hobby.

View Thinker #0080ff's profile

Oh god... is this what I get to look forward to in my science class/lab next semester? I'm just a comm major, Science is not my forte (oh the horrors of Chem).

View Thinker #c00f9b's profile

This was actually from a textbook on Social Psychology.

View Thinker #0080ff's profile

Okay, well obviously I don't know much on jargon.

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