Bipolar

I don't think I'm actually bipolar but my personality does really strange things. I was in class today and something happened that got me upset, but it wasn't even that bad. I've been through much worse. After that it seemed like my mood just continued to get worse. I think I hit bottom about an hour or so ago and it was so bad to the point where I was doing things that I really shouldn't have been doing, and then suddenly I started feeling better. I don't understand it. I know I can be moody but to have such a drastic change in such a short period of time is a little strange. It's not really a bad thing because I feel a lot better than I was earlier, it's just strange.

View Thinker #fefefe's profile

happens to me too. someone once explained to me the concept of your body's cycles throughout the day: you have a major and a minor cycle that control your hormones and so your emotion. generally around 4pm your major and minor cycles sync up on their lowest point, so you feel sleepy and shitty. I think the opposite of that is around 11pm when you feel awake and awesome because the high points sync up. it's an interesting theory, and I find it to be generally true for me. so if your mood seems to be all over the place and you start feeling upset or depressed over nothing, check the time. could just be your body conspiring against you.

View Thinker #2d042c's profile

It's a tired old piece of advice but it's true: keep an eye on things like sugar and caffeine consumption, sleep patterns, etc: these sorts of things can destabilize you pretty quickly, especially if you're particularly sensitive to one pattern or the other (my family, for example, has a marked trait of hungry-->transforms into IRRITABLE OVERREACTING BITCH MONSTER OF DOOM). If you've skipped breakfast, skipped a day at the gym, overslept, underslept, skipped your morning coffee, had cake at 10h30 am, or some other less-than-healthy variation to your normal routine, it's can definitely set you up for a bit of a crash a few hours later.

Also, it's late winter; if you're particularly sensitive to light levels your seratonin levels might be a little... um... tired. Especially on days with crappy weather.

There's definite truth to the other commenter's point about daily maximums and minimums, and that's probably a large part of what's going on, but the severity of the fluctuations can be mitigated significantly by how well you take care of yourself. Not completely, but it makes a difference.

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