Dualism

Have you ever noticed that in most, if not all European languages, there is no easy way to refer to the physical manifestation of the self without using a possessive noun or pronoun? My body. My self. "I have birthmarks on my body." "Ouch, I hurt _my_self." Trying to do it any other way makes you sound like an automaton or a sociopath. Ironically, sometimes it makes you seem more detached. "This body hurt itself." Or like a child. "I hurt me." Trying to be specific: "This body underwent an action, motivated by electrical impulses in the brain, that caused damage and pain." I blame Descartes.

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Is it safe to assume that you have studied Buddhism? All the topics of dualism are a huge topic that I have been reading a lot about recently.

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Actually, no, not much. I have a passing familiarity with some of the tenets, and I have a hobby-level interest in philosophy, but I tend away from most forms of actual religious philosophy as much as is possible given the amount the two intertwine.

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That's too bad, actually. I have been reading a series of books published in the 1970's that explores each of the major religion, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and ... I forgot the last one, gimme a break it is six in the morning. Along with a final book overlooking religion in normal.

Now, I may be making a broad statement here, but have you noticed religion in general has gotten a bad rep? People are afraid to even divulge in simple readings to at least try and understand other viewpoints. Regardless of my religious stance and upbringing, the more I have studied other religions the more I have personally realized that we as a human race aren't so different after all. Yes, after school special, but it is true. Most religions tackle the same problems, and not all necessarily in the same way, which really opens up one's mind about not only religion but viewing simple problems froma multitude of viewpoints.

IDK, mate. I would recommend at least reading through a simplified text of Buddhism, everything you have mentioned is the foundation of which Monks spend their lives trying to understand. Albeit, I don't think shaving one's head and running out to nature is exactly the thing to do to be classified as "religious," however, there is a distinct admiration for the dedication that all followers of any religion.

I digress...I am in the same boat when it comes to philosophy and religion, but there are some big questions that we all should be asking ourselves throughout our lives. And now I am rambling again...

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Buddhism and Taoism. The Tao Te Ching is a quick, beautiful read (but find a well-reviewed translation!), and communicates a lot of brilliant ideas through what is essentially philosophical poetry. It, like Buddhism, is usually referred to as something other than a religion. While Buddhism is somewhere between a psychotherapeutic approach and a lifestyle philosophy, Taoism can best be described as a mindset. Of course, both have been elaborated upon over the centuries and people have applied wacky mythologies and deities to them, but I wouldn't consider this take on Buddhism or Taoism either representative of those philosophies or worth the time it would take to study and understand them. The fundamentals of both express ideas that can easily be used to counter the struggles of daily life, regardless of what other ideas you already have about the world. I was pleased to find that I was "Buddhist by coincidence" once I started reading up on the philosophy. Same with Taoism. Hope some other people out there discover the same thing!

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Heh, that is actually on my list next to read about. I have a lot more of a respect for both philosophies/religions after studying Chinese for so long.

And who knew, meditating is fun!

View Thinker #e9ff87's profile

Love this. Love the Tao. It comforted me in the psychward.

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