Jives

So I asked burgundy what the opposite of peeves were, and she said "jives". Rather than wasting time trying to make sense of that, I'll just write out a positive counterbalance to my peeves thought.

Jives:

Renouncing a rivalry in the name of peace and understanding.

Little kids being awesome.

Artists receiving money for their work.

Anarchy, and advances in the fight toward it (i.e. the decline of racism and sexism, empowerment of the poor and working-class, and the dismantling of the idea of superior and inferior classes of people).

Advances in technology.

Fun engineering challenges.

Kids rebelling against their parents.

Leaders not getting away with war crimes and crimes against humanity.

The Internet (which should also be listed under 'peeves').

Wikipedia, Wikileaks, The Pirate Bay, and Indy Media.

The fact that I can walk into a room full of interesting strangers and discover either common interests or personal connections with all of them.

People that ask, "What can I do to help?"

Progressive protesters.

People that thank me for my work.

People that have challenged me.

Jainism, Buddhism, and Taoism.

Soy.

Pain.

Altruism.

Respect.

Honesty.

View Thinker #02584e's profile

I'm not sure Anarchy was the word you were looking for, but maybe that's just my concept of anarchy. I did like the idea that came after that, it just doesn't fit with the definition of anarchy I usually use.

View Thinker #000000's profile

Anarchy is a state of social equality and consensus-based decision making. An (without) arch (ruler). It's the opposite of a situation where people's will is nonconsensually given over to other people because they're "superior" people, or because they are compelled to by violence. Examples of anarchy are when you and your friends hang out, when a project team collaborates together to complete a task, when you go out to the store to exchange money for food instead of threatening to kill someone to get it, and whenever you have the opportunity to live your life without fearing violence or the disapproval of a ruling class of people.

Basically, the term's a nice combined catch-all for "true democracy" and "civil rights".

View Thinker #02584e's profile

I guess your opinion of "anarchy" depends on what you think of human nature. Without rule could mean we all get along together, or it could mean all hell breaks loose. At this point, culturally and socially, I'd be more inclined to say all hell would break loose without some system of support than everyone would just go live free and happy. If there are no rulers, there are no rules, and there is the opportunity for corruption, with the stronger preying on the weak. This is why I would suggest a different word, because it could go either way depending on someone's personal philosophy or view of the world.

View Thinker #02584e's profile

I would tend towards using the ideal form of "socialism" as Karl Marx saw it. I don't know. I'm just picky, and the word Anarchy bugs me for some reason.

View Thinker #000000's profile

I guess your opinion of "anarchy" depends on what you think of human nature. I didn't really discuss my opinion of anarchy, only the definition thereof. At this point, culturally and socially, I'd be more inclined to say all hell would break loose without some system of support than everyone would just go live free and happy. I'm not sure what the absence of "some system of support" has to do with what we're talking about. If there are no rulers, there are no rules The fallacy here is assuming that violence and social inequality are somehow appropriate methods of achieving peace, an opinion that is wildly popular among the Republican party. When you hang out with your friends, do you murder them when you get angry, or treat them as lessers because of the color of their skin? If not, do you avoid doing these things because you have been coerced by people with more physical or social power than you? I'm just picky, and the word Anarchy bugs me for some reason. I'm picky too. That's why I use the word anarchism to describe Proudhon, Bakunin, and Goldman's anarchist philosophy, not the media's "fireballs and broken glass woah totally awesome we should use a wicked rad word like ANARCHY to describe this" silliness.

View Thinker #02584e's profile

I'm just saying if you're going to use the an (without) arch (rule) then you can't just pick one side of it. Some groups of people would do fine without a ruler, they'd be able to work out disagreements on their own, but some would not. Because of our high level of interdependence it would be very hard to coordinate everything without someone watching over it all. You see it differently. That's fine. I just don't think anarchy should be used to describe one side of the story. Of course, I probably wouldn't be arguing as much if you had just left out this word and gone with your definition. But now I'm irked, and would rather argue the definition of anarchy than do homework. an-ar-chy 1) A social structure without government or law and order.

View Thinker #02584e's profile

Okay, maybe I'm not stopping, because this bugs me too.

"The fallacy here is assuming that violence and social inequality are somehow appropriate methods of achieving peace, an opinion that is wildly popular among the Republican party. When you hang out with your friends, do you murder them when you get angry, or treat them as lessers because of the color of their skin? If not, do you avoid doing these things because you have been coerced by people with more physical or social power than you?"

I guess right now what we're really debating is no longer what we think anarchy really is, but whether or not we think that we need a government. I would say we do. Yes, our government is not doing a particularly good job right now, but that doesn't mean we'd be any better off without any government at all. I'm also not supporting violence or social inequality, I'm simply trying to state that both of those could happen in an anarchic state. Just because there's no government "oppressing" lower class (or supporting them for that matter, as there are many organizations struggling to do just that) doesn't mean once the government's gone they will rise up and be one with everyone else. It would be an interesting social experiment to get rid of the government, but I'd want to be far away when it happened.

Also, where the fuck did that last bit come from?

View Thinker #02584e's profile

Dammit, it posted before I was done. Now I have three replies.

What I meant about the last bit is, friends are a poor example. Friends are influenced by so many factors, and oftentimes people are influenced against having certain friends due to color of skin or economic class, but those are more inherent social ideas, that come from families and theologies than governmental ideas. Sure groups of friends could get along without a government, but it's the interactions between all these groups that would cause problems. Groups would disagree, and may even come to violence (I mean, we see it enough today as is).

I'm really going to shut up now.

Or hit myself in the head with a brick.

Either way I will stop now.

View Thinker #02584e's profile

Yes, yes it is. And yet, it's so very hard to avoid.

View Thinker #77406d's profile

Violence is taught. If we teach our children (or, more likely, our grandchildren teach their grandchildren) something else, maybe something will change.

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